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Ayr Attractions

As well as celebrating the history and architecture of this lovely town, there is plenty more for visitors to see and do. The beaches are popular with families in the summer, or take a boat trip. Walkers and hikers will be in their element and salmon fishing is notoriously good. Golfers may want to slip over to play a round on the links at the Turnberry Golf Resort, home of the British Open, or at one of the three public golf courses in Ayr. Robert Burns, writer of many poems including the words to Auld Lang Syne was born at nearby Alloway, which houses a Burns Museum and Library. The ruins of the church which inspired his poem Tam O'Shanter are an interesting attraction for fans to visit.

 
Turnberry Golf Resort

Turnberry Golf Resort

Imagine rolling hills, sandy dunes, a stiff breeze blowing off the Ayrshire coast. Before designer courses, before manicured greens and major championships, these lands inspired local Scots to play the game of golf. Beloved since its first formal course was built in 1901, Turnberry's fairways have been shared by the game's elite and casual enthusiasts from around the globe. Even the conversion of its links to runways during two world wars could not diminish the desire to play here, a place made for golf, where countless competitions have been waged that shall never be forgotten. Beautiful in sun, exacting in cold and wind, Turnberry's three courses are both part of golf's legacy and part of its future. A round on The Ailsa, The Kintyre or The Arran is the kind of extraordinary experience that changes a player, professional or amateur. The draw of that experience will keep golfers returning here, to Turnberry, forever.

Hotels near Turnberry Golf Resort
Turnberry Apartments4 starfrom £90.00
Links Lodge4 starfrom £70.00
Malin Court Hotel and Restaurant3 starfrom £120.00
Maidens Guest House from £90.00
Turnberry Road Suites from £120.00
 
Culzean Castle

Culzean Castle

The range of interests and activities at Culzean provides a perfect day out for the family. Robert Adam's castle, built 1772-1790 for David, 10th Earl of Cassillis on a clifftop site associated with the Kennedy family since the late 14th century, is notable for the Oval Staircase and Circular saloon. The castle contains a good collection of pictures and 18th-century furniture, together with an armoury, set up in the 19th century.

Hotels near Culzean Castle
Whitestone Cottage from £60.00
Maidens Guest House from £90.00
Turnberry Road Suites from £120.00
Malin Court Hotel and Restaurant3 starfrom £120.00
Enochlodge4 starfrom £70.00
 
Robert Burns Birthplace Museum

Robert Burns Birthplace Museum

Ayrshire is the birthplace of Robert Burns, the National Poet of Scotland. He was born in the village of Alloway on 25th January 1759, in a thatched cottage built by his father. Ayrshire abounds with places connected with the poet, so much so that it is difficult to move within the boundaries of Ayrshire without coming into contact or being reminded of his influence and popularity in the region. His birthplace in Alloway, some two miles from the county town of Ayr, is the ideal starting point for any tour of the Ayrshire Land of Burns. Using the Robert Burns Birthplace Museum as a base you can visit the thatched cottage, referred to as the 'Auld Clay Biggin', which has been restored to its original setting as it was in the poet's time. An adjacent museum houses a unique collection of original manuscripts, including "Auld Lang Syne", paintings and personal artefacts. Within the village is the historic Kirk Alloway (circa 1516) where the poet's father and sister Isabella lie buried. The Kirk and the close-by Auld Brig O'Doon are famed for their scenes in the poet's prose "Tam O' Shanter".

Hotels near Robert Burns Birthplace Museum
Ayrs and Graces - Luxury Bed and Breakfast5 starfrom £95.00
Sunnyside Bed And Breakfast4 starfrom £35.00
Sherwood Bed and Breakfast from £60.00
Garth Madryn3 starfrom £40.00
Inverlea Guest House3 starfrom £85.00
 

Other Attraction near Ayr

  • Crossraguel Abbey - The remains of Crossraguel Abbey, which are remarkably complete and of a very high quality, include the church, cloister, chapter house and much of the domestic premises.
  • Souter Johnnie's Cottage - The inspiration for the character Souter Johnnie, Tam's 'ancient, trusty, drouthy crony' in Burns' poem Tam O'Shanter, was John Davidson, the real-life souter (shoemaker) who lived and worked in this cottage.
  • Dalgarven Mill Museum of Country Life And Costume - There has been a mill on the site since the 14th century, set up by the monks of Killwinning Abbey. The Present mill was erected in 1640 and rebuilt in 1880 after being damaged by fire.